Progress in Greening the Global Construction Industry

Noting some progress in greening the global construction industry, the United Nations environment agency (UNEP) co-released a report on Friday at the COP24 climate conference in Katowice, Poland, sounding the alarm on the need for “dramatic action” to reduce the sector’s greenhouse gas emissions. “It’s critical we have a big change over the nextcouple of […]

Trending ambitious projects in the Gulf countries

Trending ambitious projects in the Gulf countries Dubai and Abu Dhabi in the UAE, Doha in Lusail, Qatar, Manama in Bahrain have always been competing one another for commercial limelight. These days despite all oil related exports revenues these have not been witnessed to slumber somehow so they seem to be projected out by the local media. The first thing that one would notice is not only the size of investments but the unconventional nature of the extraordinary schemes that are shaping up certain areas of each of the above. Doha, for instance launched its $ billion Lusail urban development in early 2000 as a government inspired private public partnership operation that is eventually to foreign and non-resident ownership. The construction industry in the Gulf countries has always been served and serving the national private citizen and organisations alike. Dubai being the precursor in starting to allow some freehold to go to foreign and resident investors stayed at the forefront until joined by almost all of the others member countries of the GCC.

Environmentally Responsible and Resource-efficient

Per Wikipedia, Green building (also known as green construction or sustainable building) refers to both a structure and the application of processes that are environmentally responsible and resource-efficient throughout a building’s life-cycle: from planning to design, construction, operation, maintenance, renovation, and demolition.

In fact, in the Middle East, concerns for anything green were second to that fundamentally frantic development of buildings and all related infrastructure to nevertheless greater and greater awareness of their various environmental impact.  As a matter of fact, the brunt of all development was and still is located in the Arabian Gulf where carbon footprints of any urban agglomeration were recently assessed to be at critical levels.  Elsewhere in the Middle East apart from the large conurbation of Cairo, Damascus, Bagdad, Beirut, etc. things were less acutely perceived but still not exactly as clear of any criticism as one would have hoped.  Hence this ecoMENA write-up that elaborates fairly well on the subject.