The Climate Catastrophe We’re All Ignoring

The Climate Catastrophe We’re All Ignoring is a light hearted article published on Friday, September 15, 2017 by Common Dreams elaborated by Jeremy Lent on the dreadful situation we found ourselves in. Jeremy hits the right melo-dramatic not by starting with :
As fossil fuel-based economies continue, millions are suffering around the world.
The picture above is of Flooding in Bangladesh that has submerged a third of the country. (Photo: British Red Cross)
Imagine you’re driving your shiny new car too fast along a wet, curvy road. You turn a corner and realize you’re heading straight for a crowd of pedestrians. If you slam on your brakes, you’d probably skid and damage your car. So you keep your foot on the accelerator, heading straight for the crowd, knowing they’ll be killed and maimed, but if you keep driving fast enough no-one will be able to catch you and you might just get away scot-free.

Talk about Local ‘Pollution’ not Global Warming

As put by one commentator of the following article in which we’re advised to Talk about Local ‘Pollution’ not Global Warming saying: “I agree. The reason why the debate (in English) has typically been centered around climate change is because pollution is by-and-large a problem in the developing world only, whereas climate change will also impact those in the developed world.  How can we make a better scientific case for climate change to convince the public? So that the public will put pressure on policy-makers? So that they put the right incentives for private capital and businesses to tackle pollution and climate change? . . “. .

Driverless Cars Helping Humankind Sprawl out Further

In this interesting essay of Dr Timothy Hodgetts, Research Fellow in the Geopolitics of Wildlife Conservation, University of Oxford on the very actual subject of driverless cars helping humankind sprawl out further. How could this, sometime in the not so far future, affect our everyday life is concisely decortiquated in this article that is republished here with our thanks to The Conversation.
As far as the MENA region is concerned, this sprawling whilst comfortably seated behind a driverless car dash could be limited by the prevailing natural elements and that unlike those in more of clement, it will be confined to only those areas of sustainable life.

Goodbye Petrol, Hello Tesla

At a time when most car manufacturers are one after the other starting to, like for all of us, to realise and take for some of them the decision that soon every car launched will have an electric motor, there subsists doubts as to human activities have a bearing on the planet. Meanwhile scientists say the world may have already missed its chance to avoid catastrophic levels of global warming, according to a number of new research. But it is never too late and to reinforce what everyone knows perhaps instinctively, EVANNEX published an interesting post titled Goodbye Petrol, Hello Tesla written by Matt Pressman commenting a recent article of The Economist titled The death of the internal combustion engine, posted on August 15, 2017 of which we republished some excerpts here below. 

Palestine is the world’s fastest growing tourist destination

Palestine is the world’s fastest growing tourist destination as it has seen in 2017 a 57.8% rise in international arrivals says Mariam Nabbout in stepFEED citing a new report compiled by the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO). The report features two other MENA countries in its top ten list. These are Egypt, second and Tunisia, in fifth. The Telegraph amongst several other media reported on the latest trends of worldwide tourism.

Tourism that this morning of August 18, 2017 events have somewhat tarnished further in the city of Barcelona where for months some sort Tourism-phobia was soul-scathingly debated amongst the local politicians.

Would tourism be affected by these unfortunate events?

As of today, Humanity would be living in Credit

Today Wednesday August 2, 2017, we have according to Earth Overshoot Day consumed all the natural resources that the planet can produce in a whole year. This date was arrived at from the computation of a set of variable factors that are all linked directly to our way of life and generalised to all humanity. So as of today, Humanity would be living in credit and that it will be biting into next year’s reserves.  It was also found that in most cases this date always intervened earlier as we go as it were into the future.