Friend and Fellow Countryman M. Tamalt Passing Away

In commemoration of our friend and fellow countryman M. Tamalt passing away in circumstances not exactly very honorable, we reproduce herewith excerpts of 2 articles. On World Press Freedom Day, last May 3rd, the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Navi Pillay said governments must work to protect the media and “investigate and bring to justice those responsible for violent assaults upon journalists.”

Research recently conducted by the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights in the Middle East has shown that although the constitutions of the majority of Middle Eastern countries provide for freedom of expression, in reality conventional and international (including radio, satellite TV and the Internet) media remain under a restricted and intimidatory legal, political and security environment. [. . .]

Evolving into a Connected World Challenges

AMEinfo.com magazine has published this piece of reflexion on the amazing progress of technology of information sharing and processing generally. Evolving into a connected world is a prospective vision of our daily life in year 2020 and beyond but also a retrospective review of past revolutions in the technological world. Professor Khalid Al Begain elaborates in the second article for a better grasp of the workings of such changes. Here are 2 articles on the latest happenings.

Humans 2.0: Evolving into a connected world

Almost half of the global population will be using the internet by 2020
People are connecting through different devices such as smartphones, automobiles and fridges
Society is on the brink of a new technological revolution, dubbed the Fourth Industrial Revolution
The number of Internet users has doubled during the past seven years, reaching 3.2 billion users globally in 2016, According to a recent report published by Euromonitor International.
According to the findings of the 2016 Digital Consumer Index, the figure accounts for an estimated 43 per cent of the global population.

A free learning App for MENA’s youth

Change does not start through revolutions in streets. It starts in people’s minds . . .

Khadija Hamouchi, a social entrepreneur, is founder of SEJAAL, an initiative that is developing a free learning App for MENA’s youth. She has received six international awards, including Stanford Business and Innovation Fellow, Morocco’s African Entrepreneurship Award and San Francisco’s Parisoma Accelerator Programme.
In a piece for the TheArabWeekly of October 2nd, 2016, Khadija describes her views on education in the Middle East and North Africa region (MENA) region. For her, the region needs its “education empire” in its own right.
Khadija continues: “It also needs its social network and its Mark Zuckerberg. The MENA region needs to exercise as much influence as it does receive itself. It needs to start leading again, too. Just like what we used to do through innovation, knowledge development and cultural deployment centuries ago. I like to think it was not that long ago.”