Ethnobotany of medicinal plants in Mascara, Algeria

The Journal of Biodiversity and Environmental Sciences JBES on September 26, 2018 posted an enlightening article on herbal medicine as practiced in North-Africa.  This story is about Ethnobotany of medicinal plants as practised in Mascara, a large agricultural region, 400 kilometers west of the capital city Algiers.  An abstract and introduction of the study are […]

Significant rise in Sand and Dust Storms in the Middle East

The BBC television in a program dating back to 2016, elaborated citing United Nations scientists, on how there has been significant rise in sand and dust storms in the Middle East, with major impacts on human health. It claimed that mismanagement of land and water amid conflicts in the region has been a key factor, as […]

June 17th 2018, Day to Combat Desertification

The UNCCD published on June 17th 2018, day to combat desertification , this article that started with this:  A wise investment in land supports you and your future. Your choices determine future scenarios for sustainable growth. The MENA region being undoubtedly at the fore front, should combat as a matter of survival not only for […]

Welfare and Prosperity of People now and in the future

Human Wrongs Watch posted this article of the United Nations on the International Diversity Day that was celebrated yesterday May 22nd, 2018 quoting Secretary-General António Guterres’s message that highlighted that the welfare and prosperity of people now and in the future, depends on a “rich variety of life on earth”. For that to happen, would it  […]

5 Reasons we should all be climate optimists

This article written by Nina Jensen, CEO of WWF-Norway was published on 30 November 2016 on the WEF website. We republish it here for its good meaning of possibly the ultimate cause of all humanity that is to salvage what remains of the earth’s to date. It has been denied for years but more and more evidence is showing that climate change is definitely upon us. Climate change may refer to a change in average weather conditions, or in the time variation of weather around longer-term average conditions (i.e., more or fewer extreme weather events). Climate change is caused by factors such as biotic processes, variations in solar radiation received by Earth, plate tectonics, and volcanic eruptions. Certain human activities have also been identified as significant causes of recent climate change, often referred to as global warming: Wikipedia. Here are therefore these proposed 5 Reasons we should all be climate optimists . . . 5 reasons we should all be climate optimists The world is changing rapidly, and there are endless opportunities for losing sleep at night; [. . .]

Trees are much better at Creating Clouds

and Cooling the Climate than we thought!

The pre-industrial atmosphere contained more particles, and so brighter clouds, than we previously thought. This is the latest finding of the CLOUD experiment, a collaboration between around 80 scientists at the CERN particle physics lab near Geneva. It changes our understanding of what was in the atmosphere before humans began adding pollution – and what it might be like again in the future.
Most cloud droplets need tiny airborne particles to act as “seeds” for their formation and growth. If a cloud has more of these seeds, and therefore more droplets, it will appear brighter and reflect away more sunlight from the Earth’s surface. This in turn can cool the climate. Therefore understanding the number and size of particles in the atmosphere is vital to predicting not only how bright and reflective the planet’s clouds are, but what global temperatures will be.
Today, around half of these particles come from natural sources. That includes dust from the ground, volcanoes, wildfires that make soot, or sea spray that evaporates midair leaving behind tiny specs of salt in the atmosphere.
Many airborne particles also result from us burning fossil fuels. This produces soot, but also sulphur dioxide gas which is made into sulphuric acid in the atmosphere. As well as causing acid rain, sulphuric acid molecules can stick together and grow into particles . . .