Oscar Niemeyer in Algeria: Modernism in the Maghreb

Oscar Niemeyer in Algeria

Oscar Niemeyer was the reason I chose to visit Algeria in the first place said NICK @ CONCRETE AND KITSCH.
So here his story dated May 26, 2019, and titled Oscar Niemeyer in Algeria: Modernism in the Maghreb.
 After spending time among the seminal modernist architect’s works in Brasília the year prior, I was keen to see more of his futuristic and red-adjacent vision in other parts of the world.  And despite an array, impressive works in France and Tripoli, Lebanon, my heart was set on Africa.

The Beauty Behind Energy-Efficient Buildings

Sustainable Architecture: The Beauty Behind Energy-Efficient Buildings November 10th, 2018 by The Beam  As we enter a more environmentally-conscious age, we are inevitably building more ecologically responsible and sustainable cities. Creating buildings with the lowest possible energy consumption and carbon emission production, while still being aesthetically pleasing, is a challenge bringing together great minds to […]

Palestinian architect Nadia Habash discusses

Rima Al Sammarae wrote on November 4th, 2018 about how life carries on in the Palestinian territories, notably for a certain Nadia Habash, co-owner and director of Habash Consulting Engineers and adjunct lecturer at Birzeit University.  Here is, courtesy to Middle East Architect how: Palestinian architect Nadia Habash discusses working with Peter Zumthor and persevering […]

Opportunity in Today’s Construction Technology

Seizing opportunity in today’s construction technology ecosystem By Jose Luis Blanco, Andrew Mullin, Kaustubh Pandya, Matthew Parsons, and Maria Joao Ribeirinho A new analysis of the construction technology ecosystem finds emerging trends, constellations of solutions, and an ever-increasing universe of technology use cases that are disrupting the way we plan, design, and execute projects. After […]

Why did the Genoa bridge collapse?

Genoa motorway bridge collapse 4 days ago was a catastrophic one, creating a scene, rescuers compared to the aftermath of an earthquake. Italy declared a State of emergency while agreeing that the collapse of the Morandi Bridge was an “immense tragedy”. Why did the Genoa bridge collapse? Engineering experts were immediately in the limelight weighing […]

A First Comparison “Match” between Bouskoura and Darbouazza

A study of 2 suburban districts of Casablanca, Morocco is believed to be a first comparison “Match” between Bouskoura and Darbouazza as recently undertaken by JUMIA House.
A report in French of the real estate analysis with graphics and comparative results was realised by Ranya S. Alaoui, Head of Communications and released to the press together with a market analysis of JUMIA House General Manager Mr. Clément Tesconi on February 21st, 2017.

The Construction of Tall Buildings Industry in the GCC

In our previous article on Architecture of Tall Buildings published on April 13, 2015, we elaborated on this segment of the construction of tall buildings industry in the GCC and its evolution. Far from questioning the ‘raison d’etre’ or the real need for such structures, we would like to make here as close to reality a statement of what has been achieved on the ground last year. Indeed, in 2016, a record of 128 buildings were completed worldwide, according to the the Chicago-based council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH)’s Year in Review: Tall Trends of 2016. It says : While Africa has yet to see a 200-meter-plus completion since 1973, the Middle East ended the year, for the second time, with nine such completions. This continues a steady trend of completions in the region, but pales in comparison to its all-time high of 23 in 2011, a spike that was attributed to a global post-recession recovery in tall building construction. 2016 was the first year since 2006 that the Middle East has not seen the completion of a supertall (300-plus-meter) building, but one should be wary of assuming that this is indicative of a regional swing away from the supertall height threshold. Optimistic projections show as many as [ . . . ]